15 September, 2006

One Letter Makes All The Difference

From Sarah and Susan: a meme where you change just one letter in a novel title, and describe the new plot. Here are mine, featuring novels set in Edward II's reign (or thereabouts).

Lard of Misrule: Piers Gaveston's problems with overeating and the fury it engenders in Edward II's barons. (Lord of Misrule, Eve Trevaskis)

King's Wade: Bored with rowing and swimming, Edward II constructs a new water feature at his favourite manor of Langley. (King's Wake, Eve Travaskis)

The Traitor's Wire: Hugh Despenser becomes a successful pirate with the aid of a length of cable, and wonders how it could help him improve his extortion skills. (The Traitor's Wife, Susan Higginbotham)

Harlow Queen: The famous actress learns that she was Queen Isabella in a previous life. (Harlot Queen, Hilda Lewis)

The Tournament of Brood: The women of Edward II's court take part in an unusual competition to see who is the most desperate for a baby. (The Tournament of Blood, Michael Jecks)

Isabel the Pair: Isabel(la) is shocked to learn that she has an identical twin sister with the same name. (Isabel the Fair, Margaret Campbell Barnes)

The Love Knit: Isabella gets out her needles to make Roger Mortimer warm cardigans and mittens, in order to prove her love for him. (The Love Knot, Vanessa Alexander)

The Dollies of the King: Edward II tries desperately to keep his large collection of dolls a secret. (The Follies of the King, Jean Plaidy)

The Zion of Mortimer: After escaping from the Tower, Roger travels to Jerusalem to drum up support for his anti-Edward platform. (The Lion of Mortimer, Juliet Dymoke)

The She-Golf of France: Fed-up with unisex sports, Isabella returns to France to play her favourite game on a women-only course. (The She-Wolf of France, Maurice Druon)

Death of a Ming: During a row with Edward, a furious Isabella throws a vase at him. (Death of a King, Paul Doherty)

The Bows of the Peacock: Edward tries to teach a bird how to genuflect before his royal majesty. (The Vows of the Peacock, Alice Walworth Graham)

The King is a Ditch: Edward II takes one of his favourite hobbies very seriously indeed. (The King is a Witch, Evelyn Eaton)

Hummer of the Scots: Edward I invades Scotland with the aim of providing all the inhabitants with an SUV. (Hammer of the Scots, Jean Plaidy)

13 comments:

Susan Higginbotham said...

LOL! Especially The Love Knit, The Dollies of the Queen, and Hummer of the Scots.

Sarah said...

Hummer of the Scots! I can see it now.

Prince Lieven said...

LOL!! I love 'Hummer of the Scots' and 'the Love Knit!'

Gabriele C. said...

Hehe, I had a different image about those Hummers - it's German for 'lobster'. :)

Alianore said...

LOL, Gabriele! I realised that after I'd written it, but thought that the SUV angle might be more comprehensible. ;)

Are you going to do the meme?

Gabriele C. said...

Except for Sing Hereafter. the opera version of Macbeth (the hero is never too dead to sing another aria) and Winged Castle (when wizards develop fortification technologies) I had no good ideas, lol.

Susan Higginbotham said...

I like Sing Hereafter. Not to mention the picture of Edward I distributing lobsters to the deserving Scots . . .

Gabriele C. said...

Lol, thre is an opera version of Macbeth, by Verdi. Not as well known as fe. Aida and La Travita, but is has great melodies and he comes amazingly close to Shakespeare's text in some scenes.

Carla said...

Another vote for The Love Knit here. Alas, I'm not good at quick-fire puns. I shall stand quietly at the back and admire everyone else's.

CBrunner said...

I think I would do 'The Loon of Mortimer' In which Roger gives up his quest for power & becomes an avid observer of waterfowl!

CBrunner said...

Or perhaps 'The She-Wolf of Trance' in which Isabel hypnotizes everyone into believing she is the King!--HMM-- maybe that is right!!!!

Alianore said...

Haha, great contributions, C! Hmm, wonder if anyone feels like writing a novel about Isabella's hypnotic abilities - it would explain a lot! :)

Caitlin O. said...

Oh, these are great. I fear I'm releasing my inner medieval nerd, and none of my friends will get all the great new jokes.