29 May, 2012

Interview And Links

Many thanks to the wonderful historical novelist Sharon Penman for re-posting my 'Commandments for Writing about History' on her own blog!  I'm delighted!  After she, Michael Jecks and a few of my friends linked to the post on Facebook and Twitter, I got literally thousands of blog visitors within a couple of days.  Thanks, everyone!

My lovely talented awesome friend Paula Lofting has an interview with me today on her blog Paula's Perusings.  Thanks so much for inviting me and asking great questions about Edward II, Paula!  Her other blogs are Sons of the Wolf, about her fab forthcoming novel set in England in the eleventh century, and Threads to the Past, about the Bayeux Tapestry.   Hope you enjoy the interview!

I'd also like to draw your attention to some other blogs by friends of mine (please read them! :), in no particular order:

Piers Gaveston, by Anerje, who often comments here - mostly about everyone's favourite fourteenth-century Gascon knight and earl, with posts about other periods of history too.

A Nevill Feast - a detailed look at the family which played such an important role in the Wars of the Roses.

Historical novelist Susan Higginbotham - many fascinating posts about the fourteenth century, the Wars of the Roses and the Tudors.

Hannah's Thomas Cromwell Experience and Henry Tudor Experience, about Henry VII.

A Bit of Henry Love, about Henry VIII.  The latest post is an excellent rant about non-fiction history books.

Sam's Loyalty Binds Me, featuring all aspects of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century history.

Sarah's Remembering the Executed, with posts about all manner of people executed in the past, and her Sarah's History Blog, with book reviews, photos and discussions about history.  Her latest post in Remembering the Executed features Edward II's half-brother Edmund of Woodstock, earl of Kent.

Christy's blogs Rooting for Ancestors, about genealogy, and Mary Barrett Dyer, focusing on seventeenth-century cultural history in England and New England.

Fem's It Happened To Her, with posts about female oppression in history.

Lorri's exciting new blog about nineteenth-century Australia.

17 comments:

paulalofting said...

Thanks muchly for the mention Kathryn and thanks for being such a great interviewee.

Kathryn Warner said...

Most welcome, Paula, and thank you for the honour of being your first interviewee!

storyofwomen said...

Thanks for the mention and the link!
Much appreciated. :)

Kathryn Warner said...

Most welcome! :-)

Susan Higginbotham said...

Thanks for linking, Kathryn!

Kathryn Warner said...

Welcome, Susan!

panek1612 said...

I enjoyed your interview and your recent post on history.

I have a vague recollection of reading that Edward III at one point was trying to pursue having his father Edward II canonized. Do you know if this is true? It would be an interesting way of viewing their father/son relationship.

Gabriele C. said...

So Edward was prone to lose keys? Maybe umbrellas, too, like my grandmother. :)

You know, it's small bits of information like this that makes him so very human.

Kathryn Warner said...

Thank you, Panek1612! Really glad you liked the interview and the recent post. Actually it was mostly Richard II who tried to have (his great-grandfather) Ed II canonised - I don't think Ed III did much in that direction - but will double check. :-)

:-) Yes, that's why I love Ed's chamber journals so much, Gabriele - those snippets that make him so human.

panek1612 said...

Thank you, that makes sense. I've read quite a bit more about Richard II than I have about Edward III. Still, it shows that Edward II's descendants had a positive view of him, and I'd be curious to know what arguments were advanced to support Edward II's claim to sainthood.

Kathryn Warner said...

Most welcome! :) I really have to look at this in more detail, actually, as don't know too much about it. I imagine miracles were reported at Edward's tomb, or at least Richard claimed they had been, in support of the campaign.

Gabriele C. said...

That would cast a new light on Edwards possible homosexual relationships with Piers and Hugh (and maybe others). After all, it was considered a sin by the Church, and to canonise Edward would have meant that either it wasn't believed by everyone at the time that Ed had those relatiosnhips, or that he indeed didn't have them, or that some people were willing to overlook that sin for whatever reason.

Kathryn Warner said...

Very interesting perspective, Gabriele, thanks! I hadn't considered things from that angle.

Anerje said...

Congratulations on the great re-action to the post! Thanks for the mention - although I'm afraid I don't get to blog as often as I want.

Kathryn Warner said...

Thanks, Anerje, and you're most welcome! Your blog posts are always great.

Carla said...

Congratulations!

Kathryn Warner said...

Thanks, Carla!